WHAT TO READ

I'm Just Sayin'...

Like most new businesses, RPC Leadership Associates, Inc. started in an environment of uncertainty, and often tumultuous, change. We were elated when we achieved our five-year anniversary late last year and decided to celebrate by letting our readers tell us what their favorite writings were of the last five years! The results, along with six never-before-published articles, were combined to create our latest book on Making Leadership a Way of Life. In “I’m Just Sayin’…Revelations for Making Leadership a Way of Life” we captured the many ideas on how to become the leader everyone wants to follow!The book is divided into three sections. The first section highlights leading yourself. If you cannot lead yourself effectively, you have little right to expect others to follow you willingly. The second section speaks to the many relationships leaders create and leverage to the success of the organization. Collaboration is an essential element of a...
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Choosing Change

When I look at most books that written about change, the author usually focuses on either personal change or organizational change.  While each category is important, they are integral to each other and thus should be addressed together.  In, “Choosing Change”, authors Walter McFarland and Susan Goldsworthy do just that by addressing the elements of personal change and organizational change together in the same discussion. The foundation of their discussion revolves around the Five Ds for leading both personal and organizational change.  The first part of the book addresses The Change Focused Leader while the second part address The Change Focused Organization.  In both cases, change is structured around the Five Ds of: Disruption – what is driving the need for change? Desire – what is the motivation to change? Discipline – what are the many small steps necessary to build momentum? Determination - how focused is the process to change...
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Focus

As we learn to adapt to an information-rich, knowledge-poor world, focus becomes an all-important part of our success.  In his most recent book, “Focus”, Daniel Goleman, he of Emotional Intelligence fame, takes the reader deeper into what it takes to have enough focus to drive excellence.My favorite part of the book speaks to these three kinds of focus:  Inner Focus, Other Focus and Outer Focus. Inner focus keeps us in tune to our intuitions.  Without it we are rudderless. Other focus connects us to others in our world.  Without it we are clueless. Outer focus allows us to understand the larger systemic world.  Without which we would be blindsided.Whether we are leaders by position, by influence or both, it is the combination of all three areas of focus that provide us the balance necessary to achieve sustainable success in what we do.Enjoy the book!/* Font Definitions */@font-face {font-family:Arial; panose-1:2 11 6...
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To Sell is Human

When I speak with clients about getting it right the first time and avoiding re-work, the one functional area that seems the most frustrating in this area is Sales.  Typically, when you don’t do it right the first time, someone else did (or at least did it better than you) and won the business.  In his most recent book, “To Sell is Human”, Daniel Pink explores how the process of sales has changed and offers some great ideas on how to get it right the first time. My favorite part of the book is Chapter 6 where he speaks to the idea of Clarity.  One idea is turning the traditional notion of sales from Problem Solving to Problem Finding.  The better we are at finding problems and offering solutions to solve them, the more valuable we are to our clients.  The ability to do both forces us to leverage more than...
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Getting Things Done

When I work with clients around their time management challenges, we work together on the attitudinal aspects of time management.  Our mindset towards time and how we manage our time goes a long way towards successfully getting the right things done and minimizing our own procrastination.  However, a complement to the attitudinal discussion of time management is David Allen’s book “Getting Things Done – the Art of Stress-Free Productivity”.  I would venture that anyone who is struggling with time management would get something valuable from reading this book. As I tend to look at business systemically, my favorite chapter is Chapter 2 that speaks to the process of managing workflow.  The process consists of five stages we go through to deal with the work we do.  They are: Collect things that command our attention Process what they mean and what to do about them Organize the results Review the options for...
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